EZezine


CATCH THE BUZZ

Honey Bee Genes Changed By Pesticide? Seems so.

 Alan Harman

 

New research by UK scientists finds exposure to neonicotinoid insecticides causes changes in honeybee genes.

   The University of Nottingham study, published in the scientific journal Plos One, was conducted under field realistic conditions and showed that a very low exposure of just two parts per billion has an impact on the activity of some of the honeybee genes.

   The research, led by Reinhard Stöger, associate professor in epigenetics in the university's School of Biosciences, is the first comprehensive study to look at changes in the activity of honeybee genes linked to one of the recently banned neonicotinoids, imidacloprid.

   The researchers found that cells of honeybee larvae had to work harder and increase the activity of genes involved in breaking down toxins, most likely to cope with the insecticide. Genes involved in regulating energy to run cells were also affected.

   Such changes are known to reduce the lifespan of the most widely studied insect, the common fruit fly, and lower a larva's probability of surviving to adulthood.

   “Although larvae can still grow and develop in the presence of imidacloprid, the stability of the developmental process appears to be compromised,” Stöger says. “Should the bees be exposed to additional stresses such as pests, disease and bad weather then it is likely to increase the rate of development failure.”

   The study was funded by The Co-operative Group, as part of its Plan Bee campaign.

   “This is a very significant piece of research, which clearly shows clear changes in honeybee gene activity as a result of exposure to a pesticide, which is currently in common use across the UK,” coop sustainable development manager Chris Shearlock says.

   “As part of our Plan Bee campaign launched in 2009 we have adopted a precautionary approach and prohibited the use of six neonicotinoid pesticides, including imidacloprid, on our own-brand fresh and frozen produce and have welcomed the recent approach by the European Commission to temporarily ban three neonicotinoid pesticides as this will allow for research into the impact on both pollinators and agricultural productivity."


 

Quality Top Bar Hive by Gold Star Honeybees - good for you, good for your bees, good for the planet. Check us out at www.goldstarhoneybees.com.

This message brought to you by Bee Culture, The Magazine Of American Beekeeping, published by the A.I. Root Company.

Free practical insights, helpful information, and fun from Award Winning Kelley Bees's monthly newsletter.

 Need more bees?  Need better bees?  Feed Global Patties for better bee health, production, wintering and survival.  Hungry hives will often eat a patty a week -- even when pollen is available in the field. Try Global Patties and see the difference. Learn More.

Small Hive Beetle traps and control products, Worlds largest selection, all chemical free.  www.beetlejail.com

 Little Bee Books at www.littlebeebooks.comTake a look today.

Subscribe to Malcolm Sanford’s Apis Newsletter right here for a comprehensive listing of beekeeping events around the country and around the globe, check out Bee Culture’s Global Beekeeping Calendar